Saturday, March 7, 2020

More Stan & Jack News & Your Favourite Comic Shop


Ah, there you all are.
Well, I can't really add anything to the current conversation re: Comic painting, except to declare once again my lifelong love for the work of Jeff Jones, so...
Some updates, firstly here's some more sketches currently sitting above my drawing board. One old, one new:




My ongoing bid for world domination continues apace, as I can now reveal that GOSH Comics, everybody's fave comic shop in the heart of Swingin' Soho, is now stocking Stan & Jack!
So if there are any liltin' Londoners out there who were on the fence about buying the book, you now have no excuse!
Or you can still buy direct from me at: https://petedoree.bigcartel.com/ natch.

I'm also going to be doing an interview about Stan & Jack for Wits End Podcast, so I'll keep everybody updated on that, so you can all watch / listen to me waffle. Plus there's a review up at  https://downthetubes.net/?p=115793  and a piece I wrote for Bleeding Cool, explaining how the whole furshlugginer thing came about. That's at https://www.bleedingcool.com/2020/02/18/pete-dorees-adventures-of-stan-lee-and-jack-kirby-as-they-should-have-been/
When do I sleep? You may well ask, effendis!

Of course, while I was in GOSH, I had to score this chunk of gorgeousity:





So let's talk comic shops, shall we? We may've talked around this before, but let's do it again. Obviously GOSH is my current fave, but where's yours? Good experiences / bad ones? Whaddya say?

55 comments:

  1. Welcome back, Pete. Glad to see that things are going well, Nice score on the MISTY book, by the way.

    Comic shops, eh? Haven't set foot in one for years - although for a considerable part of my youth, a shop was central to my social life - and later on, another one provided both employment and education.

    I really can't take that sort of environment any more. Part of it stems from the fact that I flat-out don't like most comics being produced today - paying more for receiving less is over-simplifying the situation, but if I were to go into more depth, I'd need another 5000 words at the very least. Another part of it is the claustrophobic and unpleasant aspect of most shops, which appear more like a hoarder's dirty basement than an actual retail outlet. Some of that is due to the sheer volume of (mostly crappy) product that keeps being produced, unfortunately being crammed into a space that may have been adequate 10-20 years ago, but isn't any longer. And... I really hate to say this, but it is God's honest truth... I can't take the ultra-conservative nature of many long-term fans. The ones who will drone on endlessly about the ramifications of DC's latest reboot or the twists & turns of the X-Universe, plunking down an astronomical sum for a pile of books that they bitch about not having the time to read ("I'm six months behind! Don't talk about the latest..."). And if you suggest to them to cut back and only buy the titles that they really really like, they look at you as if you just dropped a turd.

    Going digital is a contributing factor, as well. And having Amazon available for stuff that I MUST have in hard copy/trade format. As previously stated, it must be... well on three, four years now since I've even set foot in a shop.

    I don't miss it as much as I thought I would.

    What I DO miss, however, are large used-book shops - the kind with narrow stairways descending to levels of undiscovered treasures, towering bookshelves ten feet high, endless vintage paperbacks, random boxes of comics tucked away in a corner, the smell of pulp & forgotten dreams. I miss places like that a lot. Many have closed down over the years due to kindles and economics - and that is a real shame.

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  2. Thanks K, and god yes, do I miss the wonderful used book stores me and them other two used to haunt in Cambridge ( or anywhere ) at every opportunity. Most of my best scores were in places like that, as well as coming across unexpected surprises real cheap, or even things I'd never heard of.

    My current local comic shop is pretty good for sane fans / owners , and as I think I said previously, when Dave visited the other week, he located a great little back issue market stall. But that mentality? Yeah, piss off, it's just bloody comics for gods sake.
    I was just saying on twitter, I put an ad for Stan & Jack on a couple of Kirby Facebook pages earlier in the week, and somebody commented: 'There is no reason for this to exist in the world.'
    I wasn't so much offended, as wanting to say: 'Get some proportion there, numb nuts, it's just a comic...'

    In terms of the hoarder's dirty basement, they are the ones I miss, it is all a bit too department store now for me. I mean, you walk in Forbidden Planet and you feel like you're in a posh clothes store.
    There used to be a comic shop in Ipswich that me and Philbo went to a couple of times, and that really was a basement but it was neatly laid out, so a good middle ground.
    Conversely, there's one near Dave that even he doesn't like going in, 'cos everything's piled up on the floor, with no order, and you can barely walk round. There's literally no point going in there, you'd never be able to find a single thing.
    I will be haunting that market stall though...

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  3. The above, I realize, is kind of a downer. So I'll also mention the one comic shop that really impressed me when I was younger. It was a little hole in the wall called The Turning Page. It was literally nothing more than a long hallway - but the owner made excellent use of the space provided. He also had an encyclopedic knowledge of pretty much anything you would want to know - and didn't shy away from ordering obscure indie titles or graphic albums from overseas. It was where I first saw WARRIOR, bought my first OBSCURE CITIES book, snatched up the first five-issue run of PORTIA PRINZ (try finding THAT now) and drooled over Alex Nino's SATAN TEARS (which, at $50, I had no hope at that time to purchase). It's where I first encountered Legion fandom in all its wonky glory, was turned onto the likes of David Lynch & Mojo Nixon, and basically found a safe haven of weirdo's, freaks & crazies who became friends for many years.

    They don't make shops like that any more, I think. I could be wrong. I sure hope that I am.

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  4. Yep, never been in one like that...

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  5. Ah, you gotta love the interwebs. "There's no reason for this to exist in the world." Seriously!?? I mean - SERIOUSLY!? I swear, there are so many people out there with corncobs stuck up their asses whose sole purpose in life is to go on Facebook or Twitter or Whatever and either piss on someone else's accomplishments or waste everybody's time playing 'Devil's Advocate'.

    I deal with pet shelters a lot - capturing feral cats, raising & socializing kittens so that they're ready to be adopted - that sort of thing. And online idjits quite prevalent there, too. You don't want to know.

    You're right about Forbidden Planet. I went to the one in Dublin & it was almost like going into a Hot Topic. There was also a local chain of stores (recently gone under) that had employees in uniforms with name tags (!) constantly pressuring you as you wandered through their carefully marketed layout scheme. In short, you can really really over-do it by going in the opposite direction, and no one wants that, either.

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  6. His opinion was based on the cover and the page where Stan appears. Oh right, you've really looked at this fairly and appraised it, haven't you? Like I say, I genuinely wasn't even annoyed, it was more like: By saying that, you've absolutely proven your opinion is worthless so let's move on.
    If you read the whole thing and don't like it, well ok, I'll accept it's not for you. Nothing works for everybody. but...
    Hmm, I DO sound annoyed, don't I? But, y'know, where's that guy's comic....?

    Cats? Really?? Cats???? No, I really don't want to know, K, jesus.

    And I've been to the FP in Dublin, yeah, never again.

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  7. Not a cat person, Pete? They always speak highly of you... :)

    But yeah, there's nothing more annoying than spending weeks raising/socializing cats for adoption, putting up their availability online, and then seeing countless mush-brains run the gauntlet from "Ooooh! They're SO adorable! I'd adopt one if I could, BUT... (followed by an infinite number of incredibly lame-ass excuses, none of which are of any interest to anyone)" to "Is it pure-bred? I'm only interested in a pure-bred Russian Blue that has a proper certificate, can speak Latin & poops uncut diamonds." to "Cats suck. I have a ferret. My ferret can kick your scrawny cat's ass. He likes almonds." and so on and so on.

    None of this has anything to do with comics - except, of course, for the trolling.

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  8. I'm not really an animal person, but I've got no issue with people who are, I really meant ( as I'm sure you know really, K! ) spare us from people who troll about cats ( or anything that, to me, is fairly innocuous ). If you don't have anything to say, then say nothing.
    Somebody put on the twitter a while back the general way things happen online, and it went ( for example ):
    'I like cats!'
    'I like cats too!'
    'Cats are great!'
    ..............
    'I can't believe you f**kers! You hate dogs! You suck, you dog hating f**kers!!!'
    And so on....

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  9. Meooowrr...

    That is: the closest I've been to an animal is the glorious last sequence of Love Streams. I mean:Fuck Mona Lisa. The most enigmatic smile in the History of Art is that of John Cassavetes at the man/dog.

    Comics shops? Man... I'm a classy, elegant man who loves dressing with Tommy Hilfiger and use Loewe esence. I use heavily my bro and my dealer to get my comics. End of line.

    Manuel Ruiz

    Ps. In my teen past I loved a coffee shop where they sold comics too. There I bought a classic Xmas X Men Annual, which was sold out in my local village (and it included the coming of Longshot by Arthur Adams and a splendid Wolverine story by BWSmith) as well as a timeless Conan Xmas special with Red Nails and illustrated poem Cimmmeria, both by BWS and in color.

    And yes, I still got them both physically in different versions. And more to come, 'cos I'm gonna buy for next Xmas Marvel Treasury Edition that contains Red Nails. ;)

    Manuel Ruiz

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  10. Ah, the colorized, corrected version of Red Nails - is there any better example of an honestly great Bronze Age classic?

    I think one of the main reasons people troll about comics (or cats) is simply to make themselves heard - even (although it seems 'especially') if they have nothing constructive or relevant to say. It's the being heard - it's the acknowledgement that they, too, exist - that is the thing. Or, you know, they're just assholes. Both theories have merit.

    I heard about a comic shop once (in Washington, I think) that was also a wine bar. Where one could sit among the ferns and enjoy a nice red while reading the latest issue of THE BOYS. I'm not sure how I feel about that - other than to say that it sounds like Eddie Campbell's idea of Heaven.

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  11. Pete. I strongly apologize in advance and I don't wanna sound hard, but comics shops depress me.

    I mean, I'm nothing exraordinary: a chubby, shorty, pedantic individual who likes fine clothes and that feels terribly different to the people who often go to comic shops.

    No better. No worse. Just different. I mean, my intellectual pretensions go far than jerking off with a Manara Spiderwoman cover. And my armpits doesn'n stink. Sorry if that sounds crude or rude but that's the state of things where I live. Perhaps in your country is different. If that's so, congratulations.

    And I suscribe Kiyote idea about wine bars and comics. Love it but, sadly, it's SF here. I mean, Can you imagine? A place where you can take a taste of sweet Ribera Del Duero wine while talking about the upcoming Moonshadow or the soon to be published (in April) Trillo/Breccia fairytales comic adaptations? If that sounds pedantic then I'm a happy pedantic individual. No offense here. After all, I have sung The Residents at the local karaoke, then read a lil' of Gates of Hell by Stephan Romano and Derek Rook; and finally have started watching "Faces" by Cassavetes. Yes, I'm fucking pedantic. And proud of it :D

    Manuel Ruiz

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  12. I would pay... PAY CASH MONEY, mind you... to see Manuel sing 'Constantinople' by The Residents in a pub. Even more if he did 'Walter Westinghouse'.

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  13. I got a video Kiyote. 40 seconds of stupid fury (I asked them for a lyrics video and they put me the Icky Flix video instead). Sadly I cant't share with anyone because a unknow underage 4 years old girl is doing the chorus with me. Believe if I say that Hardy Fox would have come back from the grave... to hit me hard because I didn't know the lyrics (lol).

    And I strongly apologize if my comments sound very hard. I'm not feeling superior to anybody. But I DO feel depress to check that almost nobody here share my intellectual interests.

    I mean, just please check Zona Negativa, spanish more famous comic web page. For one comment about Moonshadow (mine) you have thousands of comments about Aquaman, Batman, Spiderman...I feel like an elefant in a race of giraffes (quote from Peter Greenaway).

    Manuel Ruiz

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  14. But if somebody want to make a picture of the video that no longer exist, cos my wife have deleted for being ugly and stupid (she hates The Residents, except Demons dance alone) it showed me, pathetically trying to save 2 minutes of emptiness (my pREServed copy got no lyrics) by shouting (with a vodka and lime glass in hand) "Here I'm coming Constantinople, here I'm falling Constantinople, Fucking come" again and again (pathetic) while the lil girl shouted "Constantinople" over and over out of sync.

    No surprise that we leave the karaoke bar hastily after that... laughing hard ;)

    Manuel Ruiz

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  15. I feel your angst, Manuel, insofar as I have a long & detailed history of loving the weird, the strange & the obscure - and most of my efforts spent in trying to share some of those interests with others have mostly been met with "What THE ever-lovin' F***--!!??" - and those were the kindest responses. I won't bother to share any of the more scornful ones.

    For the most part, I have stopped trying. If I think someone I know or communicate with might like... for a mutual example, The Residents... I will mention them & point towards the proper direction to find out more. If they bite, then great - but if they don't, then I don't press it.

    I used to read Joyce in the same general way you're reading Proust right now - so yeah, I get what you're saying, feeling like 'the elephant in a pack of giraffes'. Nevertheless, since the vast population of the world consists of howler monkeys, we should be glad that the giraffes tolerate us, even share some of our same quirks. The least we can do under those circumstances is not to go full-blown-loopy bombarding them with tons of info that overwhelm them. Choose your recommendations more carefully, I guess is what I'm saying. Know your audience. Share, but don't alienate.

    It's a touchy tightrope walk, to be sure.

    Also, I'd really like to see that video. *sigh*

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  16. My audience, so to say, it's quite reduced. But at least, most of them share my tastes. Or, best said, part of them. For example:my wife loves Proust (she's on her way through 2nd book), one of my bros like Cassavetes, the other likes Kazuo Koike, my dealer loves Marvel Trasury Editions (ain't them the quintaessence of the 70s?). And every single one of them hate The Residents and love Michael T. Gilbert.

    And the day when I befriend a guy in a comic shop is still to come. And I would love to. Well, I'm not exactly fair here. Pedro is a nice individual. And he likes "Salo" by Pasolini too ;)

    Ah! Very beautiful drawings Pete. And very happy to have you back. My 20 bucks are still waiting for your green light.

    Manuel Ruiz

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    1. I liked John Cassavetes in "The Dirty Dozen."

      - Neil

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    2. Me too!! That´s a beggining, Neil. Next stop, "Opening night". Be sure to have a couple of bottles of Scotch near ;)

      Manuel Ruiz

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    3. I've also seen Grand Slam and Machine Gun McCain. Pretty good but not great films. I also own The Killers from 1964. Lee Marvin is amazing in that one. Cassavetes looks to crazed to be the good guy though.

      - Neil

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    4. I would love to watch the movies you mention but, as soon as I´m aware, there is no spanish DVD edition. The last movie with him as star I have watched was "Second minute warning". Nothing extraordinary, just for rainy Sundays (when that thing existed, I have not seen rain in almost a year) but having him in front of Charlton Heston was funny.

      I love the independent films he directed, even if I ended up exhausted.Still today I prefer to watch his (fascinating) films in two or three installments of 45 minutes each. Exception here is my favorite, "Love streams". I can watch its 135 minutes in a row like a champ!

      Manuel Ruiz

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    5. Faces is very highly regarded, but I haven't seen it.

      - Neil

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    6. I began watching last Saturday night and ended up yesterday. The plot is thin paper (a marriage goes to hell during a night of mutual infidelities),but the realization is fascinating. Like a bizarre crossover between Andy Warhol and Ingmar Bergman.

      My fave sequence is not one of the many looooooong that seems to last forever and ever (2 guys go to a prostitute appartment, one guy goes looking for a woman and find out she's with a friend and two drunk bussinesmen, 4 married women have a good time flirting with a youngster...) but that fast one that shows one character running out from a cheated husband by running all over the roof and jumping to the floor...In one single take with no specialist or digital fx. It was shocking and hilarious. I found myself watching it repeatedly 4 times!!

      A classic of the most true independent filmaking that goes very recommended if you have patience, like unusual flicks and got some spare time. And better watching in 3 or 4 installments.

      Manuel Ruiz

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    7. But, beware, the movie is crude, shot in 16 mm and high contrast black and white photography. Excellent (have watched 3 times) but I prefer others in gorgeous color, like "The killing of a chinese bookie" (please, the reduced 105 minutes version) about the owner of a nightclub that has to pay a huge debt to the mafia by killing a chinese bookie (this is, believe or not, a metaphor of Cassavetes life and times with independent movies); "Opening night", or Mrs. Rowlands as an mature, alcoholic actress in decline haunted by the ghost of a fan that has died in an accident; or my favorite "Love Streams", about two apparently disconnected stories: a divorced woman that is nuts and has lost the custody of her daughter, and a succesful writer that it´s a walking catastrophe when coming to relation with human beings.

      The reasons that make of this my favorite are plenty, but specially I like the pace of the movie (you never get bored), the music (it´s perhaps his movie that shows more music, and it´s excellent) and the unusual dreamlike sequences (that includes an operetta).

      Plus, it got my all time favorite sequence in all Cassavetes filmo: near the end, Cassavetes begins to laugh like there is no tomorrow at the sight of... well, if you´re in the mood, discover by yourself, Neil. It won the Silver Bear at Berlin Festival in 1984. And was produced by Cannon Films the same year of Chuck Norris´ epic "Missing in action". Variety is salt of life, they say.

      Manuel Ruiz

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    8. Golden Bear, sorry. And it was the last movie showed the last day of competition, at the very last hour. But Liv Ullman, President of the Jury that year, fell in love with the film.

      Manuel Ruiz

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    9. I know that Timothy Carey was in Killing of a Chinese Bookie. He always played a psychopath, whether in Kubrick's The Killing and Paths of Glory, or in East of Eden with James Dean.

      - Neil

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    10. Yes, Neil, he plays a charismatic and menacing member of the mafia in this unconventional movie. And got other minor roles in some Cassavetes flicks too. I will never forget Paths of glory. What a great film but what a truly depressing experience.

      Manuel Ruiz

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    11. You guys have completely hijacked this thread! :D

      Manuel, have you seen this?

      Gene Poole

      https://m.imgur.com/gallery/yuRNjIm

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    12. "Much praised and highly individual". Absolutely love that Cassavetes obituary!!

      And great story, which gives me the shivers... If that poor fella was condemned to 10 years for a few books, If one day Dredd comes into my Hobbit, culturally overcrowded, Hole, I think I´m up to the gas chamber, the electric chair and finally hanged (lol).

      Thanks a lot for sharing, Gene!

      Manuel Ruiz

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  17. Kids!! Have you ever tried watching the Coronavirus news with the tv mute and playing in the background the "Dawn of the dead" soundtrack by progrock italian group I Goblin?

    That is dynamite!!!! (lol)

    Manuel Ruiz

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  18. Kids! I wish you all are allright. Things in my country are getting darker and darker. This is sadly no moment for merry jokes. I want to share with you a friend's advice: if your country is being hitted by the illness don't go out home unless is essential. We are confined in our homes for 15 days at least, and many areas, as the one where I live, are closed.

    Take care kids! And good luck!! This will pass!!

    Manuel Ruiz

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  19. So. Where did everybody go?

    I thought being stuck indoors would mean MORE time on the interwebs, not less.

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    Replies
    1. In my case it means more time for Proust. Book 3 is almost finished ;)

      And happy to hear from you, Kiyote. I was wondering the same. I hope you and yours are allright. Real dark times we are living, when even a delicious, innocent, dusty second hand comic book can infect you with a mutant deadly virus that is no cold or flu. More a russian roulette for the individual and an atomic bomb for the economical and the social.

      Manuel Ruiz

      Ps. Brian Eno and his brother Roger released a couple of weeks ago the perfect antidote for these deadly days full of sad and tragic news. "Mixing colours" with its Schubert-like placid feel, is not only one of Eno's best. It's a gift for all mankind.

      Delete
    2. Seen on the internet recently: They can lock me down, but they can't make me read Proust.

      So... we can comment anonymously again?
      Is it just me, or was that not possible here for a while until just recently?
      Enjoyed your quizzes on twitter Pete, even if I did only get one of the Eerie characters ): But I agree with kiyote - it does seem like you're missing out on a sitting audience here at the moment.

      -sean

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    3. So, Comics Beat says the week just ended was the first week with no new comics appearing since... well, since anyone can remember. And Marvel have drastically scaled down on work in progress for the next few months (presumably DC have too).

      In the absence of our host I suggest thoughts about what this means for the future of the comic biz as this weeks Podium. You know, if anyone's interested.

      -sean

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    4. Probably the guy who wrote that would commit suicide if accidentally stumbled into my Hobbit hole.

      Because if I'm finishing book 3, my wife is doing the same with book 2. And then we have Proustian conversations about what we've readed. Ha! My house is scarier than a eerie manor in the fog (lol).

      Sorry I can't say anything about your suggestion. My only concern about comics nowadays is knowing when is gonna be published Moonshadow in spanish. It was expected for March the 26th, but every comic company closed doors when the Goverment approved the Alarm State (today prorrogated until April the 26th).

      Manuel Ruiz

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  21. I have friends in the biz who feel that the San Diego Con will be cancelled this year, just because it is such a huge gathering of people.

    Regards,

    Chris A.

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, I can't see it happening Chris. Short of a cheap vaccine/treatment appearing soon I can't see any crowded indoor events happening over the summer (even if the number of covid-19 cases dramatically falls soon, there'll be a need to keep up distancing to avoid a second wave).

      Anyhow, I was thinking more of publishing. Like, people have been talking for a while about what falling sales means for the future of the big two, and by extension comic shops.
      The speculation here recently about Marvel just doing reprints, and chat about Dan Didio being fired from DC seems like small potatoes now, compared to the shutdown.

      Hope you're keeping well.

      -sean

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  22. Well - good to see that many of y'all are still alive & kickin' & reading Proust. How weird that not only are ALL the used bookshops & comic shops are closed, but no new comics this week since... I dunno... 1840, maybe?

    Also odd that there is no activity here. If there was ever a time to sit around the digital campfire & chew the digital fat, it is now.

    Me - I feel cheated that after being stuck at home for months, healing from surgery & illness. that the whole planet has decided to shut down. Just as I was ready to re-enter it. It ain't fair. Nevertheless, I've been keeping busy, collecting & sorting a lot of old Kirby, Ditko & horror stuff off the net (almost all in the public domain), much of which I've never seen or read before. it's an education.

    Also watching a lot of late 60's/early 70's existential downer sci-fi flicks - were all movies in that time frame so dark? - like Colossus: The Forbin Project and Journey to the Far Side of the Sun (great soundtrack).

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    1. Nice movie choices! In that vein "Silent running" is a must too. And not so early, but real great (and downer too) are "Demon seed" and "The man who fell to earth". "Idaho transfer" got an interesting starting point but it's too poor and dull.

      If you go ahead a little, just to mid 80s so to say, What about that hidden scifi gem titled "Decoder"?

      About comics, this is a catastrophe. Not only that spanish comic companies are closed from middle March, it's also this could mean bankrupcy for many comic shops, that paid in advance for upcoming releases (like Moonshadow) that are not published yet.

      And, on top of this, now we have to face the risk of buying a comic that could be infected wit a coronavirus alive and kicking.

      Manuel Ruiz

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  23. I wouldn't worry too much about buying a comic or anything from the grocery store being infected with the virus - it apparently is rather fragile & doesn't live too long outside of a moist environment. That doesn't mean you shouldn't wash your hands and keep your distance - but it does mean you can probably get away with not bathing in & spraying everything down with bleach constantly while wearing your 24-hour hazmat suit.

    That niche 60's-70's sci-fi genre of depressing subject matter seemingly started with Planet of the Apes & ended with Zardoz (or maybe later with The Man Who Fell to Earth). Up until that point, science fiction always had a fairly optimistic viewpoint - as in 'there WILL be a future & it'll be better than now." Even shows like UFO with dying kids and scientists making extremely idiot errors was tainted, all of it giving off the vibe that the future sucks eggs, so you'd better get used to it.

    Heh. No wonder I'm such a cynic. Parents were right: That stuff WAS a bad influence.

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    1. What about Deathwatch? I love that french movie shot by Bertrand Travernier with Harvey Keitel, Romy Schneider and Harry Dean Staton? Very recommended if you happen to be in the mood of depressing scifi flicks.

      And there is one very bizarre I've never watched. It was directed by Andrezj Zulawski short after his masterpiece "Lo importante es amar" in 1975 but he stopped the shooting and the flick was not released until late 80s. I can't remember the title now, but the plot had something to do with Jesus and space travelling. And yes, it seems it's dark and pessimistic.

      Manuel Ruiz

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    2. On the silver globe. That's the tittle of the lost Zulawski 70s scifi flick.

      Manuel Ruiz

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  24. Haven't seen Deathwatch, but if Harry Dean Stanton is in it, it's going on the list.

    And hey, if you ever get tired of Proust & want to do something different, you could always translate Chaykin's last Starbuck graphic novel for us language-impaired dolts who can't read Spanish. I'm sure there's a good tale to be had there, but it's definitely beyond my meager reach.

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    Replies
    1. Well, I could write a summary and post here. But the plot is real dull. I'm a big Chaykin fan, but for my tastes he was not very inspired here.

      I read Proust in the morning and the afternoon. So perhaps tonight I can write something. Stay tuned. I can't do less for a fan of the glorious Harry Dean Staton. I've seen Lucky 4 times!!

      You are gonna like Deathwatch, for sure! He plays a great villain.

      Manuel Ruiz

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  25. Sad to hear about the passing of awesome comic book artist Juan Gimenez from covid-19.
    Anyone interested can read the first Metabarons book he did with Alejandro Jodorowsky at
    https://humanoids.com/digital/playerHtml5/id/123
    (From Humanoids, so presumably legit)

    -sean

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  26. Yes, it was real sad. He was infected in Spain, and came back to his native Argentina, where all the efforts to cure him, were in vain.

    Strange enough, Gimenez, Jodorowsky and The Metabarons came into my rescue during another cofining period in my life, in 2008, because a health problem that got me out for 2 months. My only joys these days were talking by phone with my girlfriend (now wife) and reading the Metabarons saga in a thick, but sadly size reduced, volume. It became my personal Jodo fave, followed by Alef Thau and The Incal.

    And Kiyote and every Chaykin fan: I've finished the translated summary of the last Starbuck. But it's real long. I'm gonna put it in several installments in the comment section. Hope you like.

    Manuel Ruiz

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  27. Yes, it was real sad. He was infected in Spain, and came back to his native Argentina, where all the efforts to cure him, were in vain.

    Strange enough, Gimenez, Jodorowsky and The Metabarons came into my rescue during another cofining period in my life, in 2008, because a health problem that got me out for 2 months. My only joys these days were talking by phone with my girlfriend (now wife) and reading the Metabarons saga in a thick, but sadly size reduced, volume. It became my personal Jodo fave, followed by Alef Thau and The Incal.

    And Kiyote and every Chaykin fan: I've finished the translated summary of the last Starbuck. But it's real long. I'm gonna put it in several installments in the comment section. Hope you like.

    Manuel Ruiz

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  28. THE LOST STARBUCK. PROLOGUE

    Earth has become a closed Sanctuary, the most efficient network of information: The Library of Men.

    The Masonery was resurected. Librarians had to be Masons and be marked with Alexander's Eye. The Library is financed with exports of supercomputers specifically designed for each client.

    No man can leave Earth but a young librarian, Benjamin Stryker, tried. His space ship was desintegrated.

    To be continued...

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  29. THE LOST STARBUCK. CHAPTER 1

    25 years later, a spaceship from Prometheus, which carries a supercomputer from Earth, is attacked by Kurt Brave Wolfe, Dax's mercenary. Cody came to the rescue but is defeated and buried in manure. He saved his life thanks to his android, whi becomes part of the Limmerick Rake tripulation under the name of St. Michael.

    After this failure, Starbuck receives an urgent calling. He set sails to Valhalla Planet, among every space swashbuckler, just to be informed that Earth has been destroyed and there is a reward for the guilty.

    Starbucks met again Wolfe, who apologizes and gives him a present: a hologram of Tessa (see previous Cody adventure). She says that now she's aware that Cody is innocent.

    Cody goes to Breakheart, capitol city of Paradise XX, main planet of Dax Empire. He gets Tessa...and also Shakira Farid Klein, Director of Dax Company

    To be continued

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  30. THE LOST STARBUCK. CHAPTER 2

    Cody goes with his prey to Prometheus Starpit and ask Kurt for a rescue. During the travel, Tessa tells her story: Dr. Bishop, from Prometheus, made a clon of her, who died crucified in her place. She then travelled to Dax Empire and became lovers with Shakira.

    They arrive to Prometheus Starpit, where Cody mets a enraged Rowena, because of Shakira's kidnapping. Cody orders Rowena to shut up, because she's a clon and has to follow his instructions.

    Dr. Bishop comes in. Shakira looks at him and says "Dr. Bishop??!! He is Farrell Knight, Prime Minister from Dax!!!"

    He shots Shakira and then Rowena

    To be continued

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  31. THE LOST STARBUCK CHAPTER 3

    Bishop/Knight reveals himself to be really the supposedly dead Benjamin Stryker. He contacted by chance with extraterrestrial, who gave him the plans for a hiperacelerator in exchange of info about the human area in outer space. With the machine, Stryker tried to leave Earth. He was shot but not finished. The device happened to be a teletranspoter. He first came to Prometheus, where he killed Rowena, and replaced her by a clon. Then, did the same with Shakira, from Dax. With the leaders of both major companies as puppets under his command, he contacted again with the aliens and sold mankind for more power.

    But Cody killed "his" Rowena. Frightened that somebody could discover his plans, he fooled Kurt Wolfe into destroying Earth (Stryker gave him what suposedly were the coordinates of a dead planet devastated after the plague).

    Furthermore: while talking he reveals to have unleashed a Holy War by destroying Rome and Vatican using Dax starships commanded by Prometheus robots.

    Kurt appears to rescue Shakira and finds the horrible truth

    To be continued

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  32. THE LOST STARBUCK, CHAPTER 4

    A confused and enraged Kurt kills Stryker/Bishop/Knight (who has revealed too that all this scheme was to make things easier for the aliens, who will eventually come to conquer the remains). Then Kurt ask Cody to kill him in a duel (if he lost, then he will commit suicide). Cody is defeated but same in the last second by Tessa.

    Save at the Limmerick Rake, with a Holy War and an alien invasion in progress, Cody and theirs wait for the moment... to join the winning team.

    Finis

    Ps. That's just a brieff summary, believe me. Chaykin's script is diabolical in its intense complexity and that's the problem. There are ideas for many Starbuck stories, but here are just sketched and rushed. The dialogues, clever and cynical as they are, suffers the same problem. Are way too expositive.

    Anyhow, I would love a compilation of every Starbuck page, that includes this. With comments on Chaykin himself (specially about this last adventure. How's that it was never published in english?). Even if I got every Starbuck in spanish, I would merrily pay for what would be a glorious book and an act of justice. It's a shame that this great Bronze age character has fallen into unfair Oblivion.

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  33. Many, many thanks, Manuel - your efforts here are most appreciated.

    Now I need to stop what I'm doing* & dig out that Chaykin file and follow along.

    [* Trying desperately & failing to find a source for Don McGregor's Zorro strips in their second year. I would love to read these - but I've only managed to find a few strips online & no hope of finding the book at all.]

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  34. My pleasure, Kiyote. Enjoy! I just wish that, the sooner the better, you can read it translated in a deluxe hardcover edition from, let's say, Image.

    Btw, I know that Chris, Sean and you are allright, but, What about the rest? Is Pete confined in the Zone Negative? Has Gene go to Wakanda Jungles? And where is Killdumpster? Has he join Robusters and went to Mars?

    Well kids, Are you ready for the second part of the pandemy? Have somebody mention Aldous Huxley?

    Manuel Ruiz

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